EWN Blog

 
July 8, 2016

Industry Evolution: Understanding the Impacts of the OQ NPRM

  The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) has proposed amendments, updates and clarifications to the pipeline safety regulations to address Section 9 (Accident and Incident Notification) and Section 13 (Cost Recovery for Design Reviews) of the Pipeline Safety, Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011 (2011 Act), and to certain other regulatory requirements. PHMSA has also proposed changes to the Operator Qualification (OQ) requirements and drug and alcohol testing requirements and incorporating consensus standards by reference for in-line inspection (ILI) and Stress Corrosion Cracking Direct Assessment (SCCDA) in Part 195. The public comment period for these proposed changes ended on September 8, 2015. PHMSA received comments from 35 entities. On June 1, 2016, the Gas Pipeline Advisory Committee (GPAC) and the Liquid Pipeline Advisory Committee (LPAC) met in Arlington, VA., to review several the regulations proposed by PHMSA. The GPAC and LPAC are congressionally-mandated peer review committees composed of industry, government and public pipeline safety experts that advise whether PHMSA’s proposed rules are reasonable, practical, technically feasible and cost-effective. During the month of July, EWN will explore the significant regulatory changes proposed by PHMSA in an educational series titled “Industry Evolution”, starting with their proposed core change […]
July 5, 2016

PIPES Act of 2016 & PHMSA Penalties Increased

PIPES Act of 2016 Signed into Law The PIPES Act of 2016 was signed into law by President Obama on June 22, 2016. The PIPES Act, which is more formally known as the Protecting our Infrastructure of Pipelines and Enhancing Safety Act of 2016, reauthorizes the Pipeline Safety Act through the end of September 2020. One of the top priorities of the Act is the requirement for the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) to fulfill the mandates from the 2011 re-authorization. The following is a recap of the main requirements of the PIPES Act of 2016: Provides funding for the operational expenses of PHMSA. Requires PHMSA to update Congress 120 days after the date of enactment of the Act and every 90 days thereafter on outstanding statutory directives, including the status of each mandate, reasons for its incompletion, and estimated completion date. Requires two reports on the effectiveness of integrity management programs for both natural gas pipelines and hazardous liquids pipelines. Requires a study on the new innovations in pipeline materials, corrosion prevention technology, and corresponding training. Requires vacancies to be filled on the Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee, the Technical Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Standards Committee, and […]
June 20, 2016

OSHA’s Respirable Crystalline Silica Final Rule

EWN strives to set the safety & compliance industry standard by understanding regulatory changes and updating existing courses as needed. OSHA’s Respirable Crystalline Silica Final Rule takes effect on June 23rd, 2016. The Final Rule includes separate standards for Construction (29 CFR 1926.1153) and General Industry and Maritime (29 CFR 1910.1053). Here are the changes: Respirable crystalline silica permissible exposure limit (PEL) reduced to 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air (8-hour average shift). Employers are required: Use engineering controls to limit worker exposure to PEL Provide respirators when engineering controls cannot limit exposure Limit worker access to high exposure areas Develop a written exposure control plan Offer medical exams to highly exposed workers Train workers on silica risks and how to limit exposure EWN has you covered when it comes to training your workers on the hazards of silica exposure in the workplace. Our course 17335-EWN-CBT-Respirable Crystalline Silica (OSHA) has been updated to reflect the noted changes, and will be available on June 23, 2016, so that you can begin educating your employees. Although employees will require training on the new safety and compliance measures, there are also company specific requirements you must understand and be prepared to implement. […]
February 9, 2016

The Silent Killer: Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

The Mayo Clinic defines carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning as “an illness caused by exposure to too much carbon monoxide” – a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas. Too much carbon monoxide in the air you breathe can greatly diminish your ability to absorb oxygen, leading to serious tissue damage. Carbon monoxide is produced as a bi-product of appliances used when heating your home during the cold months or using alternative power sources, such as generators, during a power outage. Due to this need for added warmth, January has become the deadliest month for carbon monoxide poisoning and is largely due to unintentional or accidental carbon monoxide exposure. Unintentional carbon monoxide exposure becomes dangerous when carbon monoxide begins to accumulate in a contained or poorly ventilated space. Signs of carbon monoxide poisoning can be subtle but should be treated as a medical emergency. Seek treatment immediately, if someone has been exposed to carbon monoxide and is experiencing: headaches nausea dizziness confusion light-headedness Safety Tips to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning as recommended by Poison Control: Have your heating system, water heater, and any other gas, oil, or coal-burning appliance inspected and serviced by a qualified technician every year. Install battery-operated CO detectors on […]
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